1. Exquisite Tweets from @TuurDemeester, @skibbi9, @CryptVanWinkle, @AC_breezy, @kimmaicutler, @DraganaMendel

    Crypto1ChanCollected by Crypto1Chan

    Cryptocurrency is the new frontier. Hold a claim in the right location, and you have a chance at building a multi-generational estate.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    Most ICO designers think like real estate developers: sell property titles, use the money to develop protocol & community. The failed 80,000 acre California City development (*1958) serves as a warning to investors: one sexy story does not a metropolis make.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    BTC/LN ~ TCP/IP
    Bitcoin is becoming a platform—a protocol stack with many features:
    - store of value
    - low trust wealth transfer
    - confidential transactions
    - tokenized securities
    - high volume payment network
    - microtransactions
    - smart contracts / programmable money

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    1/ European cities have organic shapes because citizens lacked foresight & capital to do urban planning.

    US cities emerged from a game theoretical bind: both capital _and_ foresight abt the commercial potential were available to all, hence a "race to develop" became inevitable.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

  2. TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    2/ The North American opportunity was so huge (and technology sufficiently advanced) that its urbanization truly was a race: to prospect for the most promising land, to claim a stake, to grow its value via marketing.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    3/ I think there's an analogy to be made with cryptocurrencies, which I've suggested before: twitter.com/tuurdemeester/…

    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

  3. Except Boston, Philadelphia and and every other colonial city

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    CryptVanWinkle

    Pyramids aren't power plants

  4. 4/ Of course long term development and growth will only happen in places that actually add value - US history is rife with stories about failed cities. twitter.com/tuurdemeester/…

    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    5/ So where does Bitcoin fit in this story? I'd argue that it has developed much more like European cities did, in a perpetual state of organic growth, capital shortage, and relative unawareness about its own potential.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

  5. 6/ Does that mean Bitcoin is doomed, like many cities in Europe historically, to suffer from the "law of the handicap of a head start"? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_th…

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    7/ Imo not, because there's virtually no limit to the functionality that can be built _on top_ of Bitcoin. Propelled by its network effects, Bitcoin's dominance could stabilize at 80-90% or higher—a "black hole" protocol. twitter.com/TuurDemeester/…

    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    8/ I think the jury is out to what extent complementary cryptocurrencies will accompany Bitcoin for the long term. One criticism I disagree with, is that the commercial development of an altcoin by definition put that coin in the categories of "centralized", "scam", or "doomed".

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

  6. 9/ The reason for this goes back to my first tweet: in a post Bitcoin world, both capital _and_ foresight about the commercial potential of cryptocurrencies are available to all, hence a "race to develop" (commercialization) has become inevitable for any new protocol.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

    Thanks for the links! I grew up in Bruges, Belgium -- perhaps I view Europe through a "conservation bias" lens. That said, I still think there's a significant contrast that is in line with the general point I'm trying to make.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

  7. I don’t understand your analogy. Even though I have lived in USA more than half of my life, I’ll always prefer to live in any city in Europe because they are walkable, bursting with human life, not cars idling in traffic

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    DraganaMendel

    Dragana Mendel

  8. I didn't mean it as a value judgement. I love European cities! I lived in Europe most of my life. The point I was trying to make is that there's a historical force that shaped American cities differently than European ones.

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    TuurDemeester

    Tuur Demeester

  9. I still don’t get it. Most American cities are plagued by suburban sprawl that is NOT planned by design.

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    DraganaMendel

    Dragana Mendel