1. Exquisite Tweets from @IrishTimes, @SophiaGrene, @djmgaffneyw4, @alanbeattie, @t0nyyates, @SamuelMarcLowe, @AislingTax, @CamilleLoftus, @Hippoclides, @jockhigh, @SteveMcGookin

    PreoccupationsCollected by Preoccupations

    'I felt the blood rushing up through my chest and into my head as my eyes flashed and stung. Mate. It’s not the insolence or the cheerless familiarity of it, so much as the hint of laddish menace.'

    irishtimes.com/news/world/uk/…

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    IrishTimes

    The Irish Times

  2. This is savage.

    The Irish Times @IrishTimes
    'I felt the blood rushing up through my chest and into my head as my eyes flashed and stung. Mate. It’s not the insolence or the cheerless familiarity of it, so much as the hint of laddish menace.'

    irishtimes.com/news/world/uk/…

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    SophiaGrene

    Sophia Grene

  3. Tentative but genuine qu: does “mate” normally have those negative connotations in Ireland? I offended any Irish customer in the pub I used to work in if so.

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    alanbeattie

    Alan Beattie

  4. No, it’s the tone and context. I don’t think it’s used much in Ireland.

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    SophiaGrene

    Sophia Grene

  5. It took me ages to get used to friends in uni (including an Aussie) saying it to me. In part it's that we associate it with laddish culture, but also we have no general equiv (regional variations like "hun" in Wexford aside).

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    AislingTax

    Aisling Donohue

  6. Missing tweet: 954691399567454208

  7. Gotcha. It’s much friendlier in the north of England. Then again, so is everything.

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    alanbeattie

    Alan Beattie

  8. Been trying to think of equivalent- term that can be friendly or menacing depending on context. In Dublin, 'friend' or 'pal' always menacing in my experience.

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  9. Tone is all but local equivalent “pal” has some tinge of passive aggression that Irish ears can hear in “mate”.

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    Hippoclides

    Michael O'Sullivan

  10. Do people really say that? It has a rather specific meaning in Irish.

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  11. Pal & bud used in both friendly & ... less friendly ... ways in Dublin in my experience :-)

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    CamilleLoftus

    Camille Loftus

  12. 'Head' was usually friendly iirc. 'Pal' definitely not the harbinger of a beautiful friendship in my day....

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  13. If I heard “friend” or “pal” in England I’d also sense some menace. “Pal” more neutral in Scotland, but that’s just my impression. “Squire” is surely due a revival.

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    alanbeattie

    Alan Beattie

  14. Course you know what we’re forgetting here: the gender angle! How guys & gals hear these terms likely to differ??

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    CamilleLoftus

    Camille Loftus

    CamilleLoftus

    Camille Loftus

  15. True but I’ve never heard mate/friend/pal addressed to a woman. “Love” is universal (also woman to woman, and woman to man) where I’m from.

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    alanbeattie

    Alan Beattie

  16. Being called "pal" in Glasgow may not be hostile, but it provokes hostility from me. How presumptuous!

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    jockhigh

    Johnny Haylegs

  17. I've heard about this but never encountered it. Why hasn't it taken over across the nation?

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  18. Because no-one ever listens to northerners. We are oppressed and ignored.

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    alanbeattie

    Alan Beattie

  19. Well yes there is that, it seems history is to blame etc. but that's no reason not to steal your better ideas. I believe your tea is quite popular in some of the less oppressed regions for example.

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  20. Perhaps the real question is are there any friendly terms that can't be used to express menace depending on context & intention? I find it hard to imagine anyone using 'chuck' in a threatening manner for example, but who knows?

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  21. I’d like to see the West Country “my lover” (including men to men) being given a trial at national level.

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    alanbeattie

    Alan Beattie

  22. Strongly support this. Randomisation would be a challenge but well worth it whatever it takes.

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney

  23. The Greek 'malaka' is pretty arresting, ['yassoo rey malaka!' [sic]] although it doesn't really work in translation.

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    t0nyyates

    Tony Yates

  24. As used by Brutus in Julius Caesar in the speech before Mark Antony's : 'Romans, countrymen & lovers....'

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    djmgaffneyw4

    Declan Gaffney