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    As I’ve been trained by fab @guidedogs how to navigate using tactile pavement I thought I would share some key info in a thread! First, blister paving at road crossing points. The tactile round bumpy paving at pelican crossings is usually red & bumps are in horizontal rows.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    At pelican or controlled pedestrian crossings the red bumpy blister paving is in an L shape. The vertical tail of the L connects to the building line. This helps VI people find the crossing as they follow the L into the bottom corner. This also leads to the button box.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    It’s really important not to block the bottom corner of the L shape or access to the right side button box. The button box has a tactile on the underside. This cone spins the light goes green so VI people can cross safely even when there is no beeping!

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Here you can see two different pedestrian crossing Ls at a junction with their tails pointing the way into the crossing point.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    At uncontrolled crossings, meaning without lights or a box, there is just a simple rectangle or square of yellow bumpy blister paving.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    On train platforms the bumpy blister paving is in diagonal lines rather than horizontal rows. This is mainly perceptible using my feet. There is normally a gap between the paving & platform edge. I use this kind of paving to navigate along a platform. If it’s on my right I’m safe

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Before steps or slopes the tactile paving has horizontal ridges know as corduroy! Regarding stairs they indicate the start or end of a set of stairs. There is usually a gap of an average footstep before the stairs stop or start.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    At my office we also have an indoor version of the striped tactile in front of lifts!

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    When tactile paving isn’t properly maintained and the bumps or ridges degrade it can be very unsafe for VI people. Like here it’s hard to tell where the road starts. If you see tactile paving in poor repair please report it.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    VI people use other tactile cues like drain covers, pavement texture changes & level changes to navigate. I use this drain grate that follows the south side of the kings cross plaza to get to the pedestrian crossing, stay in a straight line & avoid crowds.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Visually impaired people navigate using tactile paving in different ways. Cane users feel the vibrations & Listen to the sounds. Guide dog handlers, VI people being guided or VI people not using a cane will usually use their feet to feel the textures.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    If you see a visually impaired person pausing on tactile paving they are probably feeling it in order to work out their route or what kind of obstacle there might be. Leave us to it, don’t grab us or take us across a road unless we ask for help

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

  2. How do you tell the difference between red and yellow if they’re both rows?

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    CatherinePemble

    Catherine Pemble

  3. this last point is importaint
    I know routes by tacktile paving
    sometimes I will have to turn left or right at a road that can also be crossed. The tactile lets me know where I am

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    blindseyeview

    Charlotte & GD Layla

  4. This is a really useful and helpful thread, thank you, did not know about all the different crossing layouts, good to be aware and have a better understanding of them.

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    saralhawthorn

    Sara Hawthorn

  5. Thank you for posting this. I didn't realise about the L shape of the tactile pavement pointing to the side with the spinning cone on the controls. Never put the two together.

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    Thriobologist

    Brian Wood

  6. Nice thread. I tend to tuck in next to walls if I can because it means I only have to focus on one side. Right eye is poor, so use my cane on that side.

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    PhilippaB

    Philippa Barraclough

  7. Thank you for this thread and education! Super helpful for me to understand how these are used by VI people to navigate.

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    JennyFloria

    A Side of SideEye

  8. It's quite clever. In my scooter the tactile paving is so painful I always go to the button box with the least nearby, which apparently means I haven't been blocking the spinner!

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    artbyailbhe

    Ailbhe Leamy (Donate to your local foodbank)

  9. This thread is enormously imformative, thank you! It's amazing the stuff that I see everyday but never really properly *noticed*.

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    Dani_B

    Danielle Bryers

  10. Is it okay to say "Can I assist you here?" to a VI person? No grabbing or getting in the way. And not an offer of help, but just assistance ('help' implies helplessness and a requirement for thanks; assistance is just that, I feel).

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    thisisrjg

    Dr Jamiebear

  11. This was an amazing thread! So much I hadn’t noticed before and the tactile world beneath my feet makes a bit more sense now. Thank you!

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    johnke

    John Kelly

  12. It never occurred me that there was a reason for all the different colours and patterns. I'm so sorry for my ignorance *hangs head in shame*

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    HippyRockChick

    🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿☕KathleenKazuko☕🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

  13. To be fair, I was given loads of info yesterday by the guide dogs mobility team & other visually impaired people! It should be on the national curriculum along with general disability awareness

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Yes different countries have different types of tactile paving! It’s very interesting.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Yes cane mobility officers usually suggest using the building line to help!

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Yes I have been told the bumps can be painful which is really rubbish!

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    The L shape or the box shape of the tile layout. The colour is more for partially sighted people or people with some colour vision. The L shape indicates a controlled crossing, a box / rectangle suggests an uncontrolled crossing. A T shape indicates a zebra crossing!

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

    Assist is a good word! I would judge each situation, does the person seem happy & confident with their surroundings. Are they walking along somewhere or hovering or looking lost? Always ask first & respect the answer. No isn’t rude it’s just saying I’m fine I don’t need help.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

  14. If standardised pneumatic tyres which could be replaced or repaired at all bike shops were A Thing, it would be much easier. I have solid rubber tyres.

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    artbyailbhe

    Ailbhe Leamy (Donate to your local foodbank)

    artbyailbhe

    Ailbhe Leamy (Donate to your local foodbank)

  15. I find myself saying thank you to people a lot, but I often hope they hear me because I talk quietly haha. Don’t want those who are being kind to think I’m ignorant

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    PhilippaB

    Philippa Barraclough

  16. The thing I do, and I do it at every crossing even on my own, is say "Green Man" aloud when I see the Green Man. It helps those with VI and those looking at their phones.

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    MagsTheObscure

    Margaret Brown

  17. Fascinating; I'd always wondered. What's the twisty thing on the bottom of the pedestrian crossing button? It spins around on the green man.

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    SymbolHunter

    Symbol Hunter

  18. You don’t need to do that for VI people unless there isn’t a beeper & the tactile spinning cone under the box is broken, in which case I would usually ask someone to tell me.

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh

  19. I know. I got into saying it for my brother, it has now become second nature.

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    MagsTheObscure

    Margaret Brown

  20. Unfortunately across most of the country there aren’t tactile pavements at road crossings. In my local area there are several crossing points with no tactiles. In unfamiliar areas the lack of tactile paving can make independent travelling very difficult for visually impaired folk

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    BlondeHistorian

    Dr Amy Kavanagh