1. Exquisite Tweets from @GoodwinMJ, @APHClarkson, @robfordmancs

    PreoccupationsCollected by Preoccupations

    Remember that whole "EU rejects populism after Brexit" thing?

    2 years on...

    Sweden
    National populists now no.1 in polls

    Germany
    AfD now number 2 in polls

    Italy
    60% now for populists/hard right

    Austria
    58% for national populist coalition

    Hungary
    69% for Orban + Jobbik

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    GoodwinMJ

    Matthew Goodwin

  2. And yet none of these parties aim to leave the EU. Or end Freedom of Movement of for EU citizens. Never mind the fact that each party referenced here has its own particular ideological traditions and strategic goals. The ideological gulf between Sweden Democrats and M5S is vast.

    Matthew Goodwin @GoodwinMJ
    Remember that whole "EU rejects populism after Brexit" thing?

    2 years on...

    Sweden
    National populists now no.1 in polls

    Germany
    AfD now number 2 in polls

    Italy
    60% now for populists/hard right

    Austria
    58% for national populist coalition

    Hungary
    69% for Orban + Jobbik

    Reply Retweet Like

    APHClarkson

    Alexander Clarkson

    Every EU country has a broad spectrum of movements and faces significant risks. Populism is an element of political life in Europe that was always there and will not disappear. But dynamics of such movements need to be analysed in terms of specific ideological and social context

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    APHClarkson

    Alexander Clarkson

    Cherrypicking various poll results without differentiating between electoral systems, percentages and strength of opposing forces in each state leads to misleading analysis. Ignoring often vast ideological differences between movements is highly problematic

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    APHClarkson

    Alexander Clarkson

    Finally relentless focus on populism misses out on other structural challenges facing the EU system. Ferocious corruption within Romanian, Bulgarian or Maltese parties is the next potential crisis, yet it's ignored because it does not match a crude theoretical model of populism

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    APHClarkson

    Alexander Clarkson

    The idea that populists are an unstoppable force whose ideology must be surrendered to is a subtext that one could draw from such rhetoric

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    APHClarkson

    Alexander Clarkson

  3. Interesting chart of LR trends in rad rt support. Illustrates how story re: radical right isn't straightforward.

    Sustained rise: Aus, Fra, Ger, Ita, Swe
    Rise then slump: Fin, NL, Nor, UK
    Flat or slow decline: Bel, DK, Lux, Swi
    Sustained absence: Por, Spa (also Ire, not charted)

    James Dennison @JamesRDennison
    Here's the polling for the primary populist right party in 15 western European countries from 2005 to June 2018 (part of upcoming paper by @AndrewPGeddes and me). Draw your own conclusions 🧐

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    robfordmancs

    Rob Ford