1. Exquisite Tweets from @KamloopsArchaeo

    blechCollected by blech

    Of 600+ generations of human occupation in Canada, Europeans have been here for only 20 (<10 in BC). Let’s talk DEEP time for #Canada150 1/ pic.twitter.com/MZKJtPWYMW

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    The GG’s quote-unquote foolish remarks that turned half of twitter into anthropologists & semioticians reminds me time is hard to grasp 2/ pic.twitter.com/GjHwgcAiHd

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Forget, for a mo, hypotheses on peopling of the Americas, or etymology of "Aboriginal", or your Wikidefinition of immigrant. Just not now 3/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    The Indigenous “original immigrant” idea persists b/c we have a time problem. We, particularly settlers, have difficulty w BIG HUGE TIME 4/ pic.twitter.com/DfhcBBsRrc

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Unquestionably, the status quo benefits by undermining Indigenous longevity. If FNs are settlers too, we’re not really stealing, right? 5/ pic.twitter.com/YmZOEescgY

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    But the “we’re all immigrants” bit weakens through the lens of time. The absolute & relative depth of Indigenous occupation matters. 6/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    I talk to folks about the ancient past a lot. Kids, adults, elders. Many say they really can't imagine the span of time I’m talking about 7/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    When I show artifacts there’s a difference in response to a 200 yr old item (oooh, neat) & an 8,000 yr old item (*gingerly puts it down*) 8/ pic.twitter.com/M4hL67g8Pt

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    200 years is short enough to imagine the lives of our great-grandparents, to recognize how they lived, to sympathize w their struggles 9/ pic.twitter.com/GJo9OSSoKx

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    8,000 yrs tho? That’s ~265 generations. Your great-great-great-great-and-260-more-greats-grandparents? Just too long to imagine for most 10/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Think abt time where I live. Say BC was populated 15,000 years ago (current minimum date w good evidence). That’s about 600 generations. 11/ pic.twitter.com/tXyEUgURnl

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    (tbh archs don’t know when pple got here but min. 15,000 yrs isn’t controversial. Most expect much older finds before too long) ANYWAY...12/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Imagine people in Kamloops 13,000 yrs ago, living beside a glacial lake big as an inland sea. Figuring shit out amidst radical change 13/ pic.twitter.com/GHBH2NEHft

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Then it’s 9,700 yrs/388 generations ago. Glacial lake is gone, river is new. Figuring shit out again, still getting good @ ice-free life 14/ pic.twitter.com/40zCUi3uUD

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Then it’s 7,000 yrs/280 generations ago. Grasslands peaked, upland fishing lakes shrink. Adapting to new reality, again, still, always. 15/ pic.twitter.com/G0WsgDsz7P

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Then it’s 5000 yrs/200 generations ago. Coastal people, already trade partners, came to the river too. They stayed. Adapt to that now. 16/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Then it’s 4000 years/160 generations ago. Salmon is now running into tributaries in a predictable way. People master that too. 17/ pic.twitter.com/5Q3VVP21wD

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Then it’s 2,000 years ago. Neighbouring people are growing, getting closer, the land is a quilt of well-used, well-defined territories. 18/ pic.twitter.com/zPNbruz23R

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    Then it’s 1793. A white man is spotted on Fraser River, word spreads fast that he’s got something to offer. That was 9 generations ago 19/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    “We all arrived from somewhere else so none has a greater stake” makes it a snap to deny land claims & reparations, blame FNs for losses 21/

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond

    But these cultures have evolved IN PLACE as 600+ generations of people mastered a changing world. Your 400 years here: in the bucket. 22/22

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    KamloopsArchaeo

    Joanne Hammond