1. Exquisite Tweets from @tomstafford, @vaughanbell, @Pascallisch

    PreoccupationsCollected by Preoccupations

    nonconscious perceptual inference to recover colour constancy, innit. A glimpse of the ordinary eternal machinery that powers the self

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    tomstafford

    Tom Stafford

  2. If the effect is a colour constancy change through unconscious assumptions about lighting I want to know why people differ in this.

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    vaughanbell

    Vaughan Bell

  3. tomstafford

    Tom Stafford

    @vaughanbell Interesting how the diffs must have existed forever, but social media (and this photo) allow us to recognise them

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    tomstafford

    Tom Stafford

  4. @tomstafford True, but 75% of people see white and gold and only a tiny minority 'flip'. Makes me think it's more physiological.

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    vaughanbell

    Vaughan Bell

    There should be a simple test of the colour constancy hypothesis: create images with the right context that flips perception of the dress.

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    vaughanbell

    Vaughan Bell

    Actually, still no good explanation of ‘that dress’ mindhacks.com/2015/02/28/act… Why I'm not convinced by the 'science of' articles. Any ideas?

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    vaughanbell

    Vaughan Bell

    Totally speculative: wonder whether perceptual diffs reflect diffs in melanopsin. Blue sensitive, mediates brightness sciencedirect.com/science/articl…

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    vaughanbell

    Vaughan Bell

    "To my knowledge, this is the first strongly 'bistable' stimulus in the color domain" pensees.pascallisch.net/?p=1901 @Pascallisch on 'that dress'

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    vaughanbell

    Vaughan Bell

  5. @vaughanbell BTW: I agree that we don't have a good explanation for individual differences. Light priors, but why? slate.com/articles/healt…

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    Pascallisch

    Pascal Wallisch