1. Exquisite Tweets from @JamesSurowiecki

    PreoccupationsCollected by Preoccupations

    1. .@chrisarnade argues white working class has turned to Trump in large part because they "feel disrespected."
    theguardian.com/us-news/2016/j…

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    2. Demise of unions and other w-c institutions, he argues, have left white workers socially bereft, and Trump speaks to their anxieties.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    3. Looking at Cle. suburb of Parma, Arnade says, If Trump voters are "surging ahead...into outright racism," it's symptom of broader decline

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    4. There's one big problem with this argument, though: Parma was a bastion of racism and outright discrimination when unions were strong.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    5. Arnade notes Parma is "almost all white." What he doesn't say is it's almost all white bec. the city fought all attempts at integration.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    6. In 1970, there were 41 black ppl. in Parma, out of a population of 100K. In 1973, DOJ sued Parma for violating Fair Housing Act.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    7. Parma fought the case for 7 yrs., and did nothing to integrate. In 1980, there were still only 364 black ppl. in city,

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    8. This was the result of deliberate action to keep black ppl. out. Fed. judge who finally ruled city had discriminated found that ...

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    9. Parma had a reputation as Cle. suburb that was "most hostile to blacks." Elected officials had made "overtly racist" statements.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    10. Would-be black homebuyers were steered away. The city refused to accept any federal housing funds for fear it would require integration.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    11. In 1968, Parma City Council refused to pass a housing resolution saying only city welcomed "all persons of goodwill."

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    12. Parma was, in other words, much like the Yonkers depicted in David Simon's "Show Me a Hero." Only worse.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    13. White residents were firmly opposed to integration of any type even when unions were strong and the economy was booming.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    14. It's frankly preposterous to depict white racism in Parma as if it's a response to changing economic conditions or social anomie.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    15. Racism has been incredibly powerful in Parma for the entirety of the postwar period.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    16. Now, you might say, as ppl. in Parma did, that it's easy for white elites to talk about integration when they live in lily-white worlds.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    17. Except this isn't true in Cleveland. Shaker Heights, the ritzy suburb, made an explicit and rigorous commitment to integrate in late 50s

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    18. And maintained that commitment in the decades that followed. Results were imperfect, but ended up with far more integrated community.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    19. It's absolutely true that the working class (white, black, Latino, etc.) has gotten a raw deal from the US economy since the 1970s.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    20. It's also absolutely true that Trump, like Sanders, articulated working-class hostility to trade in a way that other candidates didn't.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    21. But white working-class racism is not a new phenomenon. It's not stronger than it was when unions were powerful.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    22. And the simple reality is that for progressive, and for the Dem Party, antiracism isn't a secondary consideration to economic justice.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    23. Both are central to any truly progressive vision. So yes, the Dems are less welcoming to some white working-class voters than once were.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    24. But that's because the Dem Party is more committed (even if imperfectly) to antiracism than it once was.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki

    25. Dems should reach out to white working class more than they have. But that can only work if white workers stop being racist. Period.

    Reply Retweet Like

    JamesSurowiecki

    James Surowiecki