1. Exquisite Tweets from @Jderbyshire

    PreoccupationsCollected by Preoccupations

    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    And this is Sjkolden, where Ludwig Wittgenstein pitched up in 1913 to write some of what would become the Tractatus

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    “I want you to bring me a slab.”

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    Just making a few minor modifications to the Tractatus at Wittgenstein’s desk

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    Ferry across Sognefjorden, Hella to Dragsvik

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    Ludwig Wittgenstein arrived in Skjolden in Norway in October 1913 with the intention of solving the “question that is fundamental to the whole of logic”

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    He travelled from Bergen by boat along the Sognefjord, a journey of some 30 hours

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    He initially lodged with the Klingenberg family in this house. His room was on the first floor on the left.

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    GE Moore visited him there in March and April of 1914. Here W marks the Klingenberg house on a postcard. Moore reported that W did most of the talking for the two weeks he was there.

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    Bertrand Russell warned W that he’d go mad with loneliness. But W made friends in Skjolden including with Halvard Draegni, who oversaw construction of a house for the philosopher on a mountain ledge overlooking a lake 3 km from Skjolden

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    “I can’t imagine working like this anywhere but here,” W would write to Moore. He adored the “silent seriousness” of the landscape

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    The house was finished in the autumn of 1914. You can see it halfway up the mountainside to the left of this photograph

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    W would return to the house in the early Twenties, once in 1931 and again for an longer period in 1936, when he was working on what would become the Philosophical Investigations.

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    W came to the house once more in 1950, shortly before he died

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    The house was dismantled and moved after W’s death. This summer the reconstruction of the house in the original was completed

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire

    One of those responsible for the reconstruction project is Skjolden native Harold Vatne. He led me up the narrow path to the house this morning. He has distilled his fascination with W’s Norwegian years in a book

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    Jderbyshire

    Jonathan Derbyshire