1. Exquisite Tweets from @jamesbridle, @debcha, @MatthewBattles, @rod, @rachelcoldicutt, @albarodtjer, @matlock

    blechCollected by blech

    Letters in C18th, serialisation in C19th, books in C20th: lit always shaped by economics of distribution, right? Anyone know of research?

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    jamesbridle

    James Bridle

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  3. @jamesbridle I don't, but @MatthewBattles might? (and I'm sure he'd be interested in the answer)

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    debcha

    Deb Chachra

  4. @debcha @jamesbridle Leah Price's "How to Do Things with Books in Victorian Britain" represents current state of the art on this question.

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    MatthewBattles

    Messengers and Promises

    @debcha @jamesbridle You might also check David Vincent's "The Rise of Mass Literacy: Reading and Writing in Modern Europe."

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    MatthewBattles

    Messengers and Promises

    @jamesbridle @debcha The post renewed its influence on 19th-c. lit with the advent of the book post in 1848, in tandem with rail.

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    MatthewBattles

    Messengers and Promises

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  6. @jamesbridle and earlier than C18 cf pettegree's the book in the renaissance (probably via @holgate who knows this stuff)

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    rod

    rod

  7. @jamesbridle there's lots of research into C19th serialisation and penny dreadfuls etc. Any Dickens biog is a starting point for references.

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    rachelcoldicutt

    Rachel Coldicutt

    @jamesbridle also (from memory) Marilyn Butler on sensation/gothic novels and romance.

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    rachelcoldicutt

    Rachel Coldicutt

  8. @jamesbridle ‘After the great divide: modernism, mass culture, postmodernism’ by Andreas Huyssen is still an essential reference.

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    albarodtjer

    Dr Rocio Rødtjer

  9. @holgate @rod @jamesbridle this is fascinating. I've been researching how cultural markets are affected by how we measure attention (/)

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    matlock

    Matt Locke

    @holgate @rod @jamesbridle eg applause in 19th century music hall, charts for film/music, ratings for broadcast, etc

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    matlock

    Matt Locke

    @holgate @rod @jamesbridle it's interesting how a cultural form (eg the novel, magazines, film, etc) needs Common measure of attention (/)

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    matlock

    Matt Locke

    @holgate @rod @jamesbridle to create a market. This in turn affects the economics of production, artistic form, and also cheating the metric

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    matlock

    Matt Locke

    @holgate @rod @jamesbridle I think any cultural form of serious scale is continually redefined by the battle between artistic innovation (/)

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    matlock

    Matt Locke

    @holgate @rod @jamesbridle the economics of distribution and gaming the metric. Art, the market & cheating define what gets made in any era.

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    matlock

    Matt Locke

    @holgate @rod @jamesbridle yes- most of my research is from late 19th C on, when public markets became more influential than patronage

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    matlock

    Matt Locke