1. Exquisite Tweets from @cstross, @debcha

    blechCollected by blech

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  4. cstross

    Charlie Stross

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  7. @quinnnorton Am trying to write a trilogy from a young female PoV without depicting a Martian’s interior space. It’s hard work.

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    cstross

    Charlie Stross

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  9. @quinnnorton Yup, it’s the same problem: othering of protagonists, inability to write them as they are, rather than as they are seen.

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    cstross

    Charlie Stross

  10. @cstross @quinnnorton I have to say that Iain (not M) Banks' THE BUSINESS is one of the few books where I felt the protagonist reflected me.

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    debcha

    Deb Chachra

    @cstross @quinnnorton Not 'inner lives of women' per se, more 'this particular character is recognizably like me, including her gender'.

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    debcha

    Deb Chachra

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  12. @debcha @nocleverhandle @quinnnorton 2nd rule of writing the other: their existence is not your-kind-of-person-centric. Not your toys.

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    cstross

    Charlie Stross

  13. @cstross @quinnnorton Sure -- that's where Neal Stephenson falls down terribly. My perspective was as a reader.

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    debcha

    Deb Chachra

  14. @debcha @quinnnorton Which NS text/character in particular? (Or was it “all of them”?)

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    cstross

    Charlie Stross

  15. @cstross @quinnnorton It was supremely obvious in the case of the 20-something African-American woman protagonist in REAMDE.

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    debcha

    Deb Chachra