1. Exquisite Tweets from @TajhaLanier, @sandypsj, @srepetsk, @alex_block, @Ryanfor3F05, @Tracktwentynine

    blechCollected by blech

    r/washingtondc this morning has INSIDER INFO on why it takes so damn long for 7000-series metro train doors to open!!! reddit.com/r/washingtondc… h/t @ChrisBChester

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    TajhaLanier

    Tajha Sophia Chappellet-Lanier

  2. This is incredibly dumb. And another thing that more automation would solve (did WMATA's previous ATO system ever have issues with doors opening on the wrong side?) h/t @amandakhurley

    Tajha Sophia Chappellet-Lanier @
    r/washingtondc this morning has INSIDER INFO on why it takes so damn long for 7000-series metro train doors to open!!! reddit.com/r/washingtondc… h/t @ChrisBChester

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    sandypsj

    Sandy Johnston 🚰

  3. (it's also not completely correct; there's just a button the operator has to press so the ATC system verifies the train is properly berthed, which wouldn't happen in ATO) ggwash.org/view/61893/eve…

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    srepetsk

    Stephen Repetski

  4. This is, sadly, not a new issue. WMATA's had issues with their automated door systems in the past. They stopped using them, and incidents *increased.*
    subchat.com/readflat.asp?I…

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    alex_block

    alex block πŸš…

    to be fair, they were having some serious technical issues. Something about power interference with berthing 8-car trains with ATO (with some cars still in the tunnel), which lead to opening doors in the tunnels, which lead to the change in procedure...

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    alex_block

    alex block πŸš…

    but the response was/is a reaction without addressing the root causes.

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    alex_block

    alex block πŸš…

  5. Ryanfor3F05

    Ryan Keefe

  6. Here's the background:

    Circa 2006, WMATA started upgrading the power system to handle 8-car operations. This caused some sort of audio-signal interference that caused the ATO system to open the doors on the wrong side of the train in several instances.
    (1/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    So in 2007ish, WMATA turned off auto-doors on trains. This added a little delay as under auto-doors, the doors opened automatically when the train stopped. With manual doors, the T/O has to go to the window first.
    (2/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    This created a new problem: Under manual doors, there was *nothing* preventing the train operator from opening the doors, so long as the train was stopped.

    But this didn't become a major problem right away.
    (3/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    At the time, Metro hadn't completed the Precision Stopping Upgrade. The 1970s system wasn't capable of reliably accurately berthing 8-car trains, so it was being upgraded to a more precise system. In the meantime, all 8-car trains were operated in manual.
    (4/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    Unfortunately, this created a situation where an operator driving an 8-car train would forget and would stop at the 6-car marker, meaning the 8th car was still off the platform. This happened a few times.
    (5/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    Then in 2009, the Fort Totten crash happened. In the wake of that, Metro made all trains operate in manual mode only at all times. (This practice continues today).

    This means that the ATO system isn't berthing trains, and the instances of mis-berthing trains went up.
    (6/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    So, Metro decided to make all trains berth at the 8-car marker at all times, no matter how long. (This practice continues today).

    But operators would occasionally still open the doors on the wrong side of the train. So, Metro instituted the "5 second rule."
    (7/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    The proper thing to do would have been to have created a technical fix that would prevent the doors from opening anywhere a platform wasn't detected without an override, but Metro figured the 5 second rule would be enough.

    Narrator: It wasn't.
    (8/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    Anyway, as @MetroReasons notes, the 7000 series require an additional berthing confirmation button be pressed when not in automatic mode. This really should be automatic, but it isn't.

    When T/Os don't push the button, it takes longer to open the doors.
    (9/)

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    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ

    Tracktwentynine

    Matt' Johnson, AICP πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆ