1. Exquisite Tweets from @stephiesque, @AuthorPrime01, @jpdailing, @stephanieelliot, @AnAuthors, @Write_Plan

    snydezCollected by snydez

    As an editor, here are some mistakes I often see writers make in their manuscripts. (THREAD)

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Problem: overusing tags.
    Example:
    “How are you today?” asked Simon.
    “I’m okay,” muttered Mark.
    “Just okay?” questioned Simon.
    “Yeah,” replied Mark.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Tags don’t have to go with every phrase, especially in dialogue between two characters.
    “I was thinking of you,” John whispered to Elle.
    “Why?”
    “It just seemed like something you’d like.”
    Even without tags for the last two, it’s clear who’s speaking.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    On a similar note, people often under-use beats. Most communication happens nonverbally, and you should show that in conversations.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Check out the difference between these two examples:
    E1: “I’m not scared,” she said.
    E2: She raised her chin and looked him in the eye. “I’m not scared.”
    One tells you what’s being said; one gives you insight into the scene and the character’s attitude.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Writers often struggle with where to begin their novel.
    Here’s a tip: start where things begin to change. Establish why the story really takes off at this point in the character’s life, and give your reader a reason to be invested from the first scene.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    I often see writers get too caught up in the mundane parts of a character’s story. If it’s a transition, write it concisely or create a scene break. We don’t need to know every time a character holds an unimportant conversation or walks to a different location.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Writers tend NOT to spend enough time world-building, especially in fantasy. Worlds never exist to serve one character; don’t write them that way. Also, even fictional worlds have some structure to them, so elements shouldn’t pop up only when the character needs them.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Another common problem: relying on adverbs.
    Ex: “I’m not a child,” she said angrily.
    Rather than depending on the narrator, try letting the character show emotions herself.
    “I’m not a child.” Resisting the urge to stomp her foot, she let out her breath in a huff and turned away.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Writers tend to fall back on the same few sentence structures over and over (and overuse commas)!
    Vary your sentence lengths. Watch the way you write and see how/if it flows. Even with a great story, your words and the way you place them must be engaging.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    Another common mistake: forgetting what your narrator does NOT know.
    Example: “My sister scrunched up her face, trying not to say what she’s thinking.”
    If your book is in first-person POV, your narrator doesn’t necessarily know what other characters think.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    This often manifests in overusing the word “because.”
    Ex: “He said nothing to me because he was too sad.”
    Instead, show the sadness nonverbally and let your readers see it for themselves.
    OR omit the “because” and split the sentence, so you’re not explaining away others’ actions.

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

  2. This was great writing advice. Thank you. It’s a perfect example of something I was discussing with another author friend of mine.

    Reply Retweet Like

    AuthorPrime01

    Gloria L Geiger 🧚‍♀️

  3. I know right! Lol I'm making a running lists of edits I need to make based off this thread :D

    Reply Retweet Like

    jpdailing

    J. P. Dailing

  4. stephanieelliot

    stephanie elliot💚

  5. Yes, I’m planning on adding more to this thread as I think of other common tendencies. I wasn’t expecting this one to garner attention! So happy to hear you liked it. :)

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

  6. I have a Wattpad friend who tends to write a sentence like this: “I had gone to his place a had given him the book I had bought ,” instead of “I went to his place and gave him the book I bought.” Literally makes my brain hurt.

    Reply Retweet Like

    AnAuthors

    AnAuthorsJourney

  7. As you world-build for your story, you’re answering many questions crucial to your characters’ lives. Not all the answers will make it into your manuscript, but it’s important that YOU know what they are. We’ve outlined some of these questions below. (THREAD)

    Reply Retweet Like

    Write_Plan

    Write Plan

  8. For those who’d like more tips on world-building, head on over to this thread I’m posting via the publishing/editing company I work for: twitter.com/write_plan/sta…

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

    It’s been days since I wrote this, but I’ll add just a quick note: if you liked this thread, here’s my Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/stephicham
    Thanks! 💕

    Reply Retweet Like

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham

  9. Here are some common grammatical mistakes writers (and non-writers) often make. (THREAD)

    Reply Retweet Like

    Write_Plan

    Write Plan

  10. For those seeking more information on grammatical mistakes, check out a thread I’m writing here: twitter.com/Write_Plan/sta…

    stephiesque

    Stephi Cham